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Are you skipping lectures?

Just before the xmas break one a few academics expressed concerns about a group of students missing lectures due to a trip that was booked that was completely unrelated to their course. The concerned academics mistakenly thought that the trip was organised by SUSU, although they were corrected the issue was brought up at Union Council on 6th February 2012, the documents (including the minutes) can be seen here.

Union Council decided that SUSU should have policy on this despite not coming to a decision on the exact detail of the policy. I have been asked to go away and come up with the detail.

After discussions with various sabbatical officers and staff members my personal opinion on the issue is that SUSU shouldn’t pose strict guidelines as to how much contact time (including lectures, tutorials, seminars etc.) a student should be allowed to miss during the term but instead note that SUSU acknowledges that the primary reason for a student to attend University is too obtain a degree.

What do you think? I may be completely wrong and perhaps you may think that there should be a certain number of days/hours that students shouldn’t miss whatsoever during the space of a term. Or it could be that the amount of time missed should be taken on a case by case basis and the reason has to be taken into account. Is this SUSU’s place to interfere?

Please leave your comments below

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4 Comments on "Are you skipping lectures?"

  1. Jonny
    Chris
    26/03/2012 at 2:40 pm Permalink

    I think as university is not compulsory education, it should be completely up to the student on how many lectures etc they attend. They are the one paying the fees and its their degree at the end of it.

    Who would decide the amount of hours that is acceptable to attend/miss? If a student is consistently missing lectures but keeps getting 1st’s in assignments and exams, should they really be reprimanded for missing lectures?

    There’s a massive difference in hours between degrees as well so to set a compulsory amount of hours would be difficult. For example if a Geography student misses one lecture from a 4 hour week, that’s a quarter of the lectures missed whereas an engineering student missing one lecture from a 25 hour would be less significant.

    I think it should be reviewed on a case by case basis and it is a University issue not a union one. The union is there to support students, not impose strict guidelines on the academic side of things.

  2. Jonny
    Sion
    28/03/2012 at 11:13 am Permalink

    I agree that SUSU should NOT be issuing strict guidelines on the number of lectures/lab sessions missed, this is a university issue and as such should be dealt with by them with the involvement of SUSU only to support students in specific cases.

    I also feel that this particular issue is being blown out of proportion, For example during first year I missed over 50% of my “compulsory” labs in one module in order to attend any away BUCS hockey matches throughout the season. I approached the member of staff in question to try and re-arrange or catch up on the labs but I was presented with a stark choice, either choose your degree or participate in extra-curricular activities (not what I expected from the shiny prospectus telling me how important extra-curricular activities were to university life).

    I know I am not the only person who has been, or probably will be, presented with such a terrible decision but it came down to what I felt was important and whether I thought I could cope with the added stress created by missing the sessions.

    University is a learning experience and students should be trusted to make the decision that is right for them in the long-term. I do not regret missing any of those labs, and have yet to find any way in which missing them has adversely affected my university career.

  3. Jonny
    Students Decisions
    28/03/2012 at 11:16 am Permalink

    I agree that SUSU should NOT be issuing strict guidelines on the number of lectures/lab sessions missed, this is a university issue and as such should be dealt with by them with the involvement of SUSU only to support students in specific cases.

    I also feel that this particular issue is being blown out of proportion, For example during first year I missed over 50% of my “compulsory” labs in one module in order to attend any away BUCS hockey matches throughout the season. I approached the member of staff in question to try and re-arrange or catch up on the labs but I was presented with a stark choice, either choose your degree or participate in extra-curricular activities (not what I expected from the shiny prospectus telling me how important extra-curricular activities were to university life).

    I know I am not the only person who has been, or probably will be, presented with such a terrible decision but it came down to what I felt was important and whether I thought I could cope with the added stress created by missing the sessions.

    University is a learning experience and students should be trusted to make the decision that is right for them in the long-term. I do not regret missing any of those labs, and have yet to find any way in which missing them has adversely affected my university career.

  4. Jonny
    Reposting Cretin
    28/03/2012 at 4:11 pm Permalink

    I agree that SUSU should NOT be issuing strict guidelines on the number of lectures/lab sessions missed, this is a university issue and as such should be dealt with by them with the involvement of SUSU only to support students in specific cases.

    I also feel that this particular issue is being blown out of proportion, For example during first year I missed over 50% of my “compulsory” labs in one module in order to attend any away BUCS hockey matches throughout the season. I approached the member of staff in question to try and re-arrange or catch up on the labs but I was presented with a stark choice, either choose your degree or participate in extra-curricular activities (not what I expected from the shiny prospectus telling me how important extra-curricular activities were to university life).

    I know I am not the only person who has been, or probably will be, presented with such a terrible decision but it came down to what I felt was important and whether I thought I could cope with the added stress created by missing the sessions.

    University is a learning experience and students should be trusted to make the decision that is right for them in the long-term. I do not regret missing any of those labs, and have yet to find any way in which missing them has adversely affected my university career.

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